How Can You Burn Belly Fat? Follow This Guide

We all want a good-looking and healthy body. Unfortunately we all store fat, we store fat in several places. The abdomen and hips are the places where this is stored the most. The belly is one of the biggest problem areas.

Besides that, it gets in your way and your clothing no longer fits, it is also one of the most unhealthy places to collect fat.

Belly fat is dangerous because it increases the chance of getting diseases such as diabetes and heart and vascular diseases. Do you have belly fat and do you want to burn it? Then read this article so that you know what to do to get rid of it.

How can you burn that belly fat?

One of the problem areas where many people want to lose fat is around the belly. Do you want this too? There are various commercials on TV or the internet that promise you a tight stomach. Promises that you don’t always get rid of your belly fat. Do not fall for commercials such as:

  • Train your abs for 8 minutes a day for a tight stomach
  • Superfoods that help you lose fat

Don’t fall for the above commercials. These products or training are not going to help you burn your belly fat. It is often nonsense. After reading this article you will know how to lose fat. I would like to share this information with you, but you will have to work with it yourself.

The truth about abs

If an advertisement comes along that promises you to grow a tight stomach in a week, then you know this is nonsense. A short workout is not going to help you change your body drastically.

Sufficient training and hard work are needed to get this done. It doesn’t go overnight. You must be willing to work for this.

Some facts about abdominal muscles:

1. Everyone has abdominal muscles. Maybe you have a stomach and you think you don’t have stomach muscles.

2. You also have abs, they just aren’t strong, trained and visible. But you can change that.

3. You can’t convert fat into muscle. It is good to know that you cannot convert fat into muscle. Fat always stays on top of your muscles. If you only train your abs you will not lose the fat on your abs.

4. Abdominal muscles can only be seen with a low percentage of fat. If your fat percentage does not go down, you will never grow abdominal muscles. To grow a six-pack you have to eat healthily, train a lot and rest enough.

Local weight loss does not work

It is not possible to lose weight alone in one place. If you only want to lose fat on your stomach then it is good to understand that this does not work. Workouts that are only suitable for a specific part of the body do not work.

These exercises are good for training your muscles but will not help you lose fat in a certain place. Now that you know this, you naturally want to find out how you can lose the fat on your stomach.

This depends on a number of things such as your age, your gender, your weight and your genetic predisposition to developing fat. These are therefore parts that you cannot influence because of certain workouts. For men, this often means that they develop abdominal fat while women store fat on the hips and abdomen.

Losing this fat is not that easy. Now that you know this, it is necessary to come up with a good plan that will greatly reduce your fat percentage so that you can finally burn that belly fat.

Healthy food

To help you even better, we share a number of recommendations with you so that you can get started today. Bear in mind that this will not change in one day, you will have to adjust your way of eating to really get rid of that tummy.

  • Keep a food diary to find out what you eat every day. It is not necessary to count calories, but it can make you more aware of what you eat every day.
  • Make it a habit to eat vegetables with every meal. Put cucumber slices on your cheese sandwich, eat a tomato in between and snack with carrot or pepper.
  • Eat enough protein because it is good for building muscle. Make it a habit to eat an egg as a snack and eat enough fish and meat every day.
  • Fats are important building materials that must be ingested. This concerns healthy fats such as nuts, olive oil, and avocado. Keep using your common sense, eating nuts all day is also not healthy due to the many calories.

Enough exercise

Healthy nutrition is an important part of growing a tight stomach. The rule is that a healthy body consists of 80% healthy food in combination with 20% exercise. There are some basic elements to move in the right way so that you lose that tummy.

No more crunches

Perhaps it feels good to perform crunches but this doesn’t work. Crunches are not going to help you lose your stomach. Performing crunches is even unhealthy for your posture. Because your muscles train in a certain shape you back will suffer from it.

Train large muscle groups

If you want a tight stomach you should stop doing abdominal exercises. With many abdominal exercises, you have the feeling that your abdomen has been trained, but that appears not to be the case. The muscles are isolated in most abdominal exercises.

Compound exercises are suitable for training abdominal muscles. Think of exercises such as deadlifts, squats, push-ups, pull-ups, and lunches. A long walk also helps you to train your abdomen.

Good abdominal exercises

Do you enjoy doing abdominal exercises but do you want them to have an effect? Then perform the following exercises to get a tighter abdomen.

  • 1. The farmer walks, lifting heavy objects where you train the whole body.
  • 2. The plank is the best exercise to train your abs.
  • 3. Ab wheel, an upgrade of the plank exercise, to become even tighter.

Do the following things to lose fat:

  • Eat healthy foods, the basis of a tight body lies in healthy, nutritious and low-fat food. Make enough time to prepare healthy meals.
  • HITT training (High-IntensityInterval Training) is a training of a short period where you exercise intensively. With this training, you make a large muscle group stronger which in turn helps with losing your tummy.
  • Enough rest, when you lose weight it is necessary that you rest. So make sure you get enough sleep and make time to relax.

When do you see results?

Eating healthier and exercising enough will make your body stronger and fitter.

You see results after a short period of four to six weeks. By weighing yourself and checking your fat percentage, you will discover that your body is changing. For men, the fat percentage must be below 15% to create a six-pack, and for women, this must be below 25%.

Diabetic Compression Socks

Diabetic socks are designed to help people with diabetes. The term diabetes mellitus refers to several metabolic conditions that directly impact the bodies ability to use and process glucose, also known as blood sugar. These conditions are chronic and can lead to dangerous, life-threatening levels of glucose within the blood. Glucose is one of the body’s prime energy sources. It is necessary for cellular function, for muscles and tissues, and for brain function. However, too much glucose in the blood can lead to a number of detrimental health conditions. The two main types of diabetes are referred to as Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. The symptoms of these diseases vary depending on how high the levels of glucose are within the blood. Long term consequences of untreated high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia, can be life-threatening. Some complications of high blood sugar levels may even include amputations. These are typically caused by infections due to impaired immune and circulatory function.

TYPE 1 DIABETES

This type of diabetes is typically diagnosed in younger individuals. In this type of diabetes, the body struggles to produce adequate levels of insulin. This type of diabetes is unfortunately irreversible. It is considered an autoimmune disease. Here, the body’s immune system attacks pancreatic cells and significantly impairs its ability to function. People with this type of diabetes are insulin dependent for blood glucose regulation and must take insulin everyday of their lives in order to function.

TYPE 2 DIABETES

Type 2 diabetes can develop at any time throughout a person’s life, even in childhood. This is the most common type of diabetes. These people are still capable of producing insulin, but not at optimal levels for the body’s health. Genetic factors can contribute to the development of this disease. Lifestyle factors such as lack of exercise and poor eating habits can increase the probability of developing this type of diabetes. There is an extremely strong correlation between obesity and this type of diabetes.

SYMPTOMS OF DIABETES

Increased Urination

Excessive Thirst

Slow Wound Healing

Numbness and Tingling in Extremities

Blurred Vision

Low Immune System

DIABETIC SOCKS PURPOSE

While medication and doctor supervision are often highly recommended by doctors for treatment of diabetes, I like to consider other methods as well to help manage and mitigate symptoms. People with diabetes can sometimes suffer from unusually cold hands and feet, numbness and tingling, and/or swelling in the legs and feet. When blood flow is restricted, it can cause many uncomfortable or even dangerous symptoms. High blood glucose levels within the blood can seriously damage veins, nerves, and blood vessels. Circulation is often impaired or restricted in diabetes. This can lead to purple looking feet, swelling, or overall discomfort. People who are suffering from diabetes may find that diabetic compression socks help prevent clotting, which is always a risk when the body’s circulatory and nervous systems have become damaged. Diabetic socks work by reducing pressure in the lower leg and in the foot, prevent blistering on the skin, and minimize the accumulation of moisture.

RISKS OF POOR BLOOD CIRCULATION

poor blood circulation-diabetic socks

I’ll go over a few of the risks of inadequate blood flow to illustrate just how helpful these socks can really be for someone who is struggling with diabetes and with the management of its symptoms. Diabetes is one of the major causes of poor blood flow within the body. Insufficient circulation is actually quite serious, and its signs should not be overlooked. Poor circulation can damage an individuals organs and limbs. Luckily, hope is not lost and there are many things diabetes sufferers can do on their own to help improve circulation, like wearing those compression socks that I discussed previously.

WHY DIABETIC COMPRESSION SOCKS ARE USEFUL

These socks have an immense amount of benefits for those who need a little more circulatory support. These socks can be used by men, women, and children alike. Some have inquired about the difference between socks for diabetes and actual compression socks. Socks designed for people with diabetes mesh with the exact shape of the foot. Being seamless and without elastic, these socks do not bunch or bind. Thus, this limits the amount of discomfort experienced by wearers. These socks also reduce friction injuries and abrasion on the skin. Some people with diabetes have decided to wear compression socks. However, compression socks typically utilize very strong elastic components to form their structure. This pressure encourages blood to safely and sufficiently flow back to the heart. I have seen them significantly reduce leg swelling. These socks also reduce the risk of clotting and other conditions such as deep vein thrombosis. Many people choose to wear these on long flights and drives or if their lifestyle lends itself to be more sedentary. Even so, not all people with diabetes need to wear these socks. Those who have symptoms of circulatory impairment or distress are the one’s who may most benefit from wearing these types of socks. These socks can truly help prevent damages from occurring. For some people, these socks are a major part of keeping their health in balance.

MORE ON HOW SPECIALLY DESIGNED SOCKS HELP DIABETICS

Unfortunately, those with diabetes often find themselves at a higher risk for developing major circulatory issues. When worn consistently, I believe that these special socks can really get rid of any major nerve sensitivities. Other conditions, such as foot ulcers and scrapes often go unrecognized in diabetes because they fly under the radar. Traditional socks are best avoided when one has diabetes because they do not provide proper support and care. The seams in these socks can lead to rubbing and abrasions. They can also cause unnecessary pressure. These socks also hold onto moisture in ways that can cause major problems. Excess moisture can contribute to fungal infections. Circulation can easily become restricted in these types of socks because they get tighter and tighter as they are worn throughout the day.

GENERAL FOOT CARE FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DIABETES

Podiatrists recommend that diabetes sufferers stay on top of their foot care to prevent serious conditions from occurring. Daily checkups can ensure that a cut or even some swelling does not go unchecked. Every little detail matters here!

Stay on top of injuries so that seemingly minor problems do not turn into major issues that could become exacerbated over time.

Maintain a healthy diet/exercise regime and do not smoke! Smoking has been shown to impair blood flow and circulation by decreasing the amount of oxygen circulating throughout the body.

HOW TO PICK THE RIGHT SOCKS FOR YOU

The sock you buy depends on wearer preference, comfortability, and affordability. Bamboo is my preferred material because of its special antifungal and antibacterial properties. These socks should still be well taken care of and washed pretty immediately after wearing in order to hinder the growth of any bacteria. Additionally, taller socks are often recommended because their increased height allows for increased circulation. These socks should be washed in warm water and treated delicately. Each sock can last around six months to a year and should be thrown away immediately if they become damaged. However, they may last longer if they are treated with care.

CONCLUDING THOUGHTS ON SOCKS FOR DIABETES

There are ways to manage the uncomfortable symptoms that may accompany all forms of diabetes. The best socks for diabetes sufferers are the ones that meet these top criteria:

Moisture-wicking

Seamless

Anti-bacterial

Padded

Individuals typically wear these socks all day; that way, chances of injury are lessened as that person goes about their day. Being barefoot can actually be very risky for someone who has an impaired circulatory system. If feet have gotten dirty or sweaty, socks should definitely be changed in order to maintain the cleanliness of the foot. Each sock has been carefully designed to form to the wearer’s foot, while simultaneously allowing them to breathe. It is important to ask a doctor which type of sock they recommend for you depending on the severity of your symptoms because some socks may be inappropriate or inadequate. There have not been any downsides to these socks noted and even people who do not have diabetes may enjoy wearing these socks, if they choose to do so! These socks are available at many common stores. Some are cheaper than others, but it might be worth your penny to invest in a more reliable, sturdy brand. These socks come in many different colors. However, some people prefer to wear white socks because they more easily show blood or any signs of discharge emanating from one’s wounds. If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you very well may benefit from wearing diabetic socks. Pregnant women with gestational diabetes may also find relief from their swollen feet by using these socks. Overall, diabetic foot care can be considered to be crucial for maintaining a person’s entire health. Diabetic socks are best used when the wearer is also maintaining a healthy diet, exercising as often as the doctor recommends (if he or she recommends exercise), and following their doctors orders. The feet can be one of the most sensitive parts of the body. It’s best to protect them! Please feel free to share this article on social media.

Health Insurance Coverage for Cancer Survivors or Cardiac and Diabetes Patients in India

Introduction:

The basic health indices in India have widely improved since we became independent in 1947, the average life expectancy has gone up, the infant mortality rates and maternal mortality rates have improved a lot but we still have a long way to go before we achieve developed or European standards.

These improvements happened because of improvement in education, sanitation, health care facilities and increase in disposable income resulting in general improvements in living standards across the board.

Today we are producing more cereals, pulses, fruits, poultry, fish and also consuming more as a result the availability of protein in our diet has improved very much resulting in taller and healthier Indians.

But along with increase in disposable income and increasing living standards there is increase in consumption of alcohol, tobacco, red meat and fatty foods.

The increase in affluence and affordability of new technological gizmos has made us more sedentary and dependent even for smallest and easiest of the job; today we tend to use mobile phone from the comforts of our home to contact grocer, pharmacist, maid, electrician, mechanic, etc.

And instead of walking to nearest convenience store, we tend to use vehicle and instead of walking or cycling for moving-around in our neighbourhood we take motorised vehicle.

Many of us will have trouble remembering last time we walked a distance to catch an auto rickshaw or taxi today we tend to book taxi and it picks us up from our door step.

Which along with unresponsive or indifferent civic management has resulted in unplanned development across most of the urban centres where availability of potable water, sanitation services are under stress along with increased and unmanaged vehicular, industrial, ground, noise pollution.

In 2012 GOI with Indian council of medical research released an updated definition of overweight and revised the figures to:

If BMI (Body Mass Index) is between 18-22.9kg/m2 person is of normal weight

If BMI is 23-24.9kg/m2 the person is overweight.

If BMI is more than 25 kg/m2 the person is OBESE.

In 21st century obesity has taken epidemic proportion in India and more than 5% of population comes under definition of OBESE.

While studying of 22 SNP ( single nucleotide polymorphism) near to MC4-R-gene, scientist have identified a SNP 12970134 to be mostly associated with waist circumference. In this study nearly 2000 people of Indian origin participated and this SNP was found to be most prevalent in this group.

Hence genetically we are predisposed towards abdominal obesity and this is one of the biggest morbidity factor behind diabetes type 2 and cardio vascular disease.

Globally 3-5 million deaths are because of obesity, 3.9% years of life lost and 3.9% of years lost to disability adjusted life years.

All the above has increased the number of Indians suffering from non-communicable lifestyle induced diseases like Cancers,Cardiac Vascular diseases, Diabetes, Hypertension, Mental Illness, breathing disorders like Asthma etc.

What is the disease burden for non-communicable prevalent disease like cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in India? (Reference: Background papers on Burden of disease in India published by National commission on macroeconomics and health)

The figures for Diabetes, CVD (Cardio vascular disease) and cancers are alarming and the biggest percentage of new cases are being reported from Urban areas and the younger men and women are as vulnerable as middle aged men.

Diabetes:

India is projected to become diabetes capital of the globe, it is estimated that in 2015 approximately 4.6 crore Indians were diabetic.

The prevalence is estimated as:

In 30-39 years age group around 6% of population is estimated to be diabetic.

In 40-49 years age group around 13% of population is estimated to be diabetic.

In 70+ years age group around 20% of population is estimated to be diabetic.

Diabetes has been recognised as one of the major contributing factor towards increase in numbers of Cardio Vascular Disease (CVD) patients in India.

Cardiovascular Disease (CVD):

It is estimated that around 6.4 crore Indians had one or the other condition which can be classified as CVD.

Coronary Heart Disease is a mix of conditions that include Acute Myocardial Infraction, Angina Pectoris, Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) and inflammatory heart disease.

It is increasing in rural areas it is estimated to effect 13.5% of rural population in age group 60-69 years.

More and more cases of CVD are being diagnosed among young adult in age group 40 and above.

Cancers:

It is estimated that nearly 10 Lakh new cancers wold have been diagnosed in 2016 and 670,000 deaths were expected because of cancer in 2016.

Across the globe Cancers account for 5.1% of disease burden and 9% of all death, in India cancers account for 3.3% of disease burden and 9% of all deaths.

Response of health insurance companies towards the increased disease burden:

Looking at the large number of people being diagnosed and being affected by increased disease burden, it is a fact that all these diseases or conditions are rejected as preexisting conditions and risks are not accepted by any insurance company.

The best response has been benefit policy from Life insurance companies which offer fix term plans for cancer or cardiac disease but for paying the benefit the diagnosis has to be during policy period.

The survivor benefit plans popularly known as critical illness benefit policy pays only when the disease becomes critical particularly in cancer today many cancer cases are diagnosed and treated completely during the early stage and do not become critical hence most claims under the Critical Illness can only be made once disease reached 3rd or 4th stage of manifestation.

Presently schemes for people diagnosed by or surviving these diseases are bare minimum some insurance companies have tried to launch products catering to people with some preexisting condition or survivors but the effort seems halfhearted.

New India assurance have launched Cancer care policies with Indian cancer society and CPAA but both these policies exclude existing cancer patients or Cancer Survivors and only enrol people who have no sign of cancer.

Health Insurance Policies for Cardiovascular Disease Patients:

Start Health and Allied insurance company has launched Star Cardiac care policy for people who have undergone PTCA, CABG within 7 year period prior to the commencement of the coverage under this policy.

Few features of Cardiac Care insurance policy:

There are 2 sections of the policy section 1 is normal health insurance with PED covered after 48 months, 2% limitation on room, doctor fee and nursing charges subject to max of Rs.5000 per day and liability in case of package rates is limited to 80%of package rates.

But section 2 covering giving coverage to known cardiac cases there is no limitation other than SI.

There is a waiting period of 91 days before a person can claim for any complication because of preexisting cardiac condition under this policy

Health Insurance plans for people with diabetes:

In Diabetes space there are two products Diabetes safe from Star Health and Allied insurance company and Energy Health insurance plan from Apollo Munich Health insurance company:

A comparison between the two products is as:

Insurance Company: Star Health Insurance

Product: Diabetes Safe Insurance Plan

Who is covered?

Patients suffering from Type 1 and type 2 diabetes

Number of plan:

2 plans in plan A pre-acceptance medical test must, in plan B no pre-acceptance medical tests

Waiting period: In plan A no waiting period, in plan B 15 months waiting period for coverage of disease related to CV system, Renal System disease of eyes and diabetic peripheral vascular disease, foot ulcers

Family floater option: available,both plans have 2 section one section covers

benefits under family floater and section 2 is specific to diabetes care.

Sum Insured Rs. 300,000, to Rs. 10,00,000

Income Tax Benefit: Under 80(D)

Limitation:

For Cataract the limitations are defined as :

For SI 3-500,000 liability to Rs.20,000 per eye person and Rs. 30,000 per policy period

For SI Rs. 10,00000 liability limited to Rs. 30,000 per eye person and Rs.40,000 for policy period

For diseases of cardio vascular system the limitation are defined as:

For SI 300,000 liability limited to Rs.200,000

For SI 400,000 Liability limited to Rs.250,000

For SI 500,000 liability limited to Rs. 300,000

For SI 10,000,00 liability limited to Rs.400,000

Cost of artificial limbs limited to 10% of SI if amputation is related to diabetes.

Insurance Company: Apollo Munich health insurance co. Ltd

Product : Energy Health Insurance Plan

Who is covered?

Patients suffering from Type 2 diabetes, impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance and or Hypertension are covered.

Number of plan: Single plan

Waiting period : No waiting period, day 1 hospitalisation arising out of diabetes and hypertension

Family floater option: No, policy available on individual basis

Sum Insured : Rs. 200,000 to Rs. 10,000,000

Income Tax Benefit : Under 80(D)

Limitation: No limits

VAS (Value added services): Health coach, telephonic consultation, health line, discounts, access to wellness portal that conducts HRA, stores medical record

Optional VAS services: diagnostic monitoring program to monitor and manage health).

Rewards: Discounts on premium and addition benefits on good health management

Pregnancy In The Stone Age – Can We Learn Something?

The woman who became pregnant during the Stone Age faced huge risks compared with today’s mother-to-be. There was no way to control bleeding or infection; Caesarean section was not an option. That we survived as a species seems remarkable – until you dig a little deeper.

The outcome of pregnancy depends on the underlying health of the mother, nutrition before and during pregnancy and the threat of infection. In all those areas the woman of 50,000 years ago was better off than her counterpart today. How is that possible in an age when there was no plumbing, no medical care and no protection from infectious diseases?

Better diet, better pregnancy

The primitive woman’s diet was less likely to be deficient in important nutrients than that of today’s young girls. (Ref 1) A study from the University of Cincinnati Medical Center has confirmed earlier reports that adolescent and adult pregnant women take in too little iron, zinc, folate and vitamin E.

A woman who begins pregnancy without sufficient calcium, vitamin D and other bone-building nutrients increases her risk of developing osteoporosis in middle age. But that’s not the end of the story. Her infant may also be at greater risk of fracture in the future. Osteoporosis of middle age is at least partly programmed before birth, especially if the mother smokes and has little physical activity. (Ref 2, 3, 4)

Most laypersons believe that Stone Agers were hearty meat-eaters. Anthropologists know that isn’t so. They lived on a predominantly meat diet for only about 100,000 years, from the time that Homo sapiens developed keen hunting skills until the advent of farming. Before that time meat came from carrion and small game. The bulk of their calories came from vegetables, fruit, roots and nuts.

Plant foods contain everything that a pregnant woman needs, including vitamins, antioxidants, protein and minerals. Modern vegetarians often become deficient in vitamin B12 but small game, birds’ eggs and the deliberate or accidental inclusion of insects in the Stone Age diet provided more than enough of that critical nutrient.

Folic acid deficiency in early pregnancy leads to defective formation of the infant’s brain and spinal cord. Those abnormalities are much less likely among the babies of mothers who receive an adequate amount of folate, at least 400 micrograms per day. So few women eat enough green leafy vegetables to boost their folate levels, the U.S. government requires that manufacturers of baked goods add it to their products.

Obstetricians have been prescribing multivitamins for their pregnant patients for decades but it is only in recent years that studies confirmed the wisdom of that practice. In 2002 the American Medical Association reversed a position of long standing and recommended that everyone, with no exceptions, needs a multivitamin/multimineral preparation every day in order to avoid subtle but health-damaging inadequacies of these nutrients. Taking a multivitamin reduces the risk of congenital defects of the newborn, especially those that involve the heart. Preeclampsia is a serious, sometimes fatal complication of pregnancy. Women whose intake of vitamins C and E is low have a threefold greater risk of that condition. (Ref. 5, 6)

Would these mostly vegetarian early Stone Agers have become iron-deficient? Not likely. Their diet was rich in iron as well as in Vitamin C that facilitates iron absorption. Under those conditions iron deficiency would have been rare. Cereal grains interfere with iron absorption, which explains why iron-deficiency is common in societies that subsist primarily on grains. However, one of the main reasons why Stone Age women were unlikely to be iron deficient is that they didn’t have nearly as many menstrual cycles as modern women do.

In a primitive society the onset of menses is about 5 years later than that of American young women. Modern hunter-gatherers, like the oldest Stone Agers, are either pregnant or nursing during most of their childbearing years and they only menstruate a few times between weaning one child and conceiving another. In those groups breastfeeding does suppress ovulation because it is literally on demand, i.e., every few minutes, even throughout the night. For a modern breastfeeding mother, on demand often means no more frequently than every couple of hours and perhaps once or twice a night after the third or fourth month. Thus menses return in spite of nursing and monthly blood loss continues.

The fish-brain connection

Beginning about 150,000 years ago our ancestors discovered seafood. The increased intake of fatty acids in fish and shellfish initiated the great advance in brain size and complexity that allowed humans to progress more quickly in the next 100,000 years than they had in the preceding million. Enormous gains in toolmaking and the development of language and group communication followed.

The human brain is composed mostly of water but the solid portion is mostly fat. The body can’t manufacture the omega-3 and omega-6 fats that make up so much of the structure of the brain and eye so we need them in our diet. Maternal deficiency of these nutrients, especially omega-3s, prevents the newborn brain and eyes from reaching their full potential. The best source of omega-3 fats is fish; nuts and leafy green vegetables are also good sources.

Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are found in every cell of the body. They allow efficient flow of nutrients, regulate nerve impulses and keep inflammation in the right balance. In a proper diet there is an equal amount of omega-3 and omega-6 fats. That allows the immune system to fight infection, a real threat that humans faced from the Stone Age until the age of antibiotics, a mere 70 years ago.

The advantage to the baby of a diet that is rich in omega-3 fats is obvious but mothers need it, too. Nature protects the unborn infant by tapping into the mother’s stores of omega-3 fats. A woman whose intake of omega-3 fatty acids is low during the months and years preceding pregnancy will develop a deficiency of her own. This becomes worse with succeeding pregnancies if her intake of omega-3s remains low. Postpartum depression affects about 10 percent of women following delivery and it is associated with a deficiency of omega-3 fats. (Ref 7, 8)

The newest epidemic

There is one complication of pregnancy that never occurred in the Stone Age: type 2 diabetes. No disease in modern times has risen so fast. It has increased several-fold since the 1950s; between 1990 and 2001 it rose by 61 percent. Gestational diabetics (Ref. 9) are those who do not yet have the full-blown disease but they cannot process blood sugar (glucose) properly during pregnancy. About half of them will develop frank diabetes in the years following delivery of their infant.

Most of us know type 2 diabetes, which was once referred to as adult-onset diabetes, as the disease that our grandparents developed in their later years. It’s no longer uncommon to find it in adolescents, even in grade-schoolers. As it has dipped into the younger generation it has alarmed – but not surprised – physicians to find that it is no longer a rarity in obstetric practice.

How can we be so certain that the pregnant Stone Ager didn’t have diabetes? This is a lifestyle disease that has three major associations: a low level of physical activity, a diet that is high in refined grains and sugars, and obesity. Those conditions simply didn’t occur during the Stone Age. Their lifestyle demanded strenuous effort. Grains of any sort were not part of their diet because they require tools and controlled heat. Sugar as we know it simply didn’t exist and honey was an occasional lucky find. Obesity would have been non-existent, as it is today among the planet’s dwindling populations of hunter-gatherers.

Diabetic mothers have more complications of pregnancy than normal women do. Their babies are 5 times as likely to die and are 3 times as likely to be born with abnormalities of various organs.

They kept germs at bay

Common wisdom states that Stone Age people were an infection-ridden lot but that simply isn’t true. They had powerful immune systems because of high levels of physical activity and a remarkably varied diet. Between the protective antibodies that a mother passed across the placenta and those that she conferred on her newborn via breastmilk, Stone Age babies had more protection against the germs of the day than modern infants do.

Sexually transmitted diseases don’t spread very far or very fast when people live in small isolated bands as they did during the Stone Age. The likelihood that today’s pregnant female will have at least one of these infections is more than 50 percent (Ref. 10). The impact on babies can be severe; some die, some will be brain-damaged.

Choice and consequences

Tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs have produced a generation of infants with problems that Stone Age babies never faced. Mothers who smoke have infants that are smaller than the norm and whose brain development may be compromised. Alcohol or cocaine use by the mother during pregnancy results in stunted growth, congenital defects and other severe problems.

Given a choice, none of us would want to live in a Stone Age world but we have neutralized the almost miraculous medical advances of the last century. We have allowed our daughters to be less physically active and to subsist on a marginal diet. If we could reverse those two factors alone there would be a dramatic decline in prematurity and other complications of pregnancy.

The lessons that we can learn from the Stone Age are not subtle, obscure or beyond our capacity to imitate them. We can produce the healthiest generation ever by making better choices for our children and for ourselves.

Philip J. Goscienski, M.D. is the author of Health Secrets of the Stone Age, Better Life Publishers 2005. Contact him via his web site at http://www.stoneagedoc.com.

References

1. Giddens JB et al., Pregnant adolescent and adult women have similarly low intakes of selected nutrients, J Am Diet Assoc 2000;100:1334-1340

2 Cooper C et al., Review: developmental origins of osteoporotic fracture, Osteoporosis Int 2006; 17(3):337-47

3 Prentice A et al., Nutrition and bone growth and development, Proc Nutr Soc 2006 Nov;65(4):348-60

4 Lanham SA et al., Intrauterine programming of bone. Part I: alteration of the osteogenic environment, Osteoporos Int 2008 Feb;19(2):147-56

5 Keen CL et al., The Plausibility of Micronutrient Deficiencies Being a Significant Contributing Factor to the Occurrence of Pregnancy Complications, Am Soc Nutr Sciences J Nutr 2003 May;133:1597S-1605S

6 Bodnar LM et al., Periconceptional multivitamin use reduces the risk of preeclampsia, Am J Epidemiol 2006 Sep 1;164(5):470-7

7 Freeman MP, Omega-3 fatty acids and perinatal depression: a review of the literature and recommendations for future research, Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids 2006 Oct-Nov;75(4-5):291-7

8 Kendall-Tackett K, A new paradigm for depression in new mothers: the central role of inflammation and how breastfeeding and anti-inflammatory treatments protect maternal mental health, Int Breastfeed J 2007;2:6

9 Greene MF and Solomon CG, Gestational Diabetes Mellitus – Time to Treat, N Engl J Med 2005 June 16; 352(24):2544-46

10 Baseman JG and Koutsky LA, The epidemiology of human papillomavirus infections, J Clin Virol 2005 Mar;32 Supple 1:S16-24

Weight Loss – Four Reasons Your Diet May Not Be Working And How To Fix It

Weight loss frustration is very common for many as no diet ever tends to be completely linear. One week you see great results and the next? It feels like your diet has stopped working entirely. What gives? How come your weight loss plan is not giving you the results you were going for? There are four common reasons why a diet may not be working, and fortunately, it is not too difficult to get past this.

Let us look at what you need to know…

1. Your Calorie Intake Is No Longer Appropriate. First, the most common reason a weight loss plan is not working is the calorie intake is no longer appropriate. If your calorie count does not change as you make progress, that is the first sign your diet may not be as great as it appears.

For every ten pounds you lose, you need to rework your calorie intake. Your body weight has changed; therefore your food choices need to change as well.

2. Your Body Has Adapted. Another common reason for lack of results is because your body has adapted to the calorie intake. If you have been on your weight loss plan for more than three or four weeks, your metabolic rate may have slowed down to accommodate the food you are eating. If you are using a lower carb diet plan, this will be even more predominant as the body starts adjusting to fewer carbs and hormones.

The solution? Come off the diet for a week or so. Eat more calories and more carbs in particular, and then go back to the weight loss plan. See if this doesn’t solve your problem.

3. You Are Bored With Your Food Choices. If you are bored with your food choices, that too can cause a diet to fail. Once you start to feel dissatisfied with your weight loss plan you are far more likely to start eating food not on the plan. A little bite of cake here, a French fry you stole off your significant other’s plate – it all adds up.

Dietary boredom can lead you astray so use a diet that keeps you interested.

4. You Are Missing Key Nutrients. Finally, if you are missing key nutrients, this too could begin to impact your fat loss progress. Iron and zinc are two major ones required for optimizing your hormones and making sure you are enjoying ideal energy levels as you go about your weight loss plan.

Calcium is another nutrient you will want to get enough of and some people find adding dairy helps speed fat loss from the abdominal region.

A mixed, balanced weight loss plan is key, so if that is not what you would say yours is, find another.

Diabetes: So Far so Good

There was this guy who jumped off the 37th floor of a tall building. As he fell, people at each floor inside the building heard him say as he passed them, “So far, so good…so far, so good…”

Diabetes is a disease which cannot be “trusted.” I know that’s an odd way of putting it, but bear with me for a moment here. As a medical professional, I have dealt with countless cases of diabetes. I have always been amazed people will plan for the future as they build lives, careers, families, dreams…creating and pursuing commitments for the long term… And yet, one issue stands out consistently. People with diabetes tend to hope the disease will just “maintain itself,” that it will just stay at status quo for the long term.

Diabetes cannot be trusted to stay anywhere…much less at status quo. Like the guy falling from the 37th floor, people with diabetes tend to keep telling themselves… “So far, so good…so far, so good…so far, so good…” Folks, hope is NOT a strategy. It is a necessity, but it is NOT a strategy in dealing with a disease like diabetes.

Diabetes: The “fall out” is too great to ignore…

As I said earlier, I am amazed how well people can plan for the long term, creating and pursuing future commitments but do NOT plan long-term for diabetes. Of course, the natural question is: “What are the long term issues with diabetes?”

With diabetes, a person is two to four times more likely to develop cardio-vascular disease. Being a cardio-vascular surgeon, I saw this particular problem constantly in my field. And I saw it consistently in young and middle aged people with diabetes.

With diabetes, people are TWENTY-FIVE times more likely to develop retinopathy (deterioration of the retinas). Because of diabetes, 24,000 people lose sight every year!

With diabetes, 60-70% of those afflicted suffer nerve damage which can lead to non-traumatic lower limb amputations. This is due to the fact that open sores that do not heal, accompany diabetes. As they become ulcerated, the diabetic faces complications which can lead to amputation of limbs.

People with diabetes are AT RISK for kidney failure.

Diabetes is responsible for the increased risk for strokes…two to six times more likely because of their condition.

Diabetes: the good news or the bad news…

Well, which do you want…the good news or the bad news first?

As a doctor, having dealt with diabetes in many patients, it’s always best to know the BAD news up front. Why? Complacency is harmful to your health. The danger with diabetes is people get complacent. Nothing seems to happen until, suddenly, it seems to sneak up on you with its complications…

The bad news can be REALLY bad if you are someone who has any of the following conditions which terribly complicate diabetes. Complicating factors are:

1 smoking,

2 high cholesterol,

3 high blood pressure,

4 obesity,

5 physical inactivity

With these factors, predicting the progress of diabetes is very problematic. Simply put, they MUST be brought under control, if possible. Diabetes thus becomes very unpredictable.

By keeping your blood glucose under control, you can reduce the risk of complications of diabetes up to 76%. That’s good news.

More good news: By healthy eating, responsible dietary weight loss, regular physical activity, monitoring blood sugar… you can reduce risk in diabetes.

Bad news: Status quo again. You’re still “stuck” with diabetes.

Diabetes: Being hit by “friendly fire.”

Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are auto-immune conditions. In type1 diabetes, the immune cells are mis-instructed to attack islet cells in the pancreas that make insulin.

Mind you, there is nothing wrong with the islet cells. There is MIScommunication by the immune system of the body. In other words, immune attack cells can get faulty messages and destroy healthy tissue. Isn’t it just awful that your diabetes can be caused by “friendly fire?” (Military terminology here. The good guys are hitting their own good guys with artillery fire.)

MIS-communication …. hum. Sounds like what’s needed is a healthier communication system at the cellular level so the body isn’t attacking its own healthy cells.

Now, for some really good news…

Glyconutrition is the nutritional provision which provides the body with healthy CELLULAR COMMUNICATION. In other words, for diabetes, this means less “friendly fire.”

A study published in the 1997 issue of the Proceedings of the Fisher Institute for Medical Research showed people with type 1 diabetes who were given glyconutrients “…reported a dramatic improvement in their health, including a decrease in vision problems, better wound hearing, less infections, and lower blood pressure.” (Miracle Sugars, by Rita Elkins, M.H., Woodland Publishing, p. 26 -Excellent quick reference incidentally!)

Remember, both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are auto-immune conditions. Read carefully, this next statement by medical researcher, Dr. Neecie Moore:

“Glycobiology has achieved critical breakthroughs in the medical field, primarily by addressing what could be the greatest plague in health care today — auto-immune diseases. Multiple sclerosis, arthritis, diabetes, Crohn’s disease and colitis are just a few of these diseases.”

Research on glyconutrition is growing wonderfully. For example, the Ophthalmology Department of Harvard University in 1995 reported that one of the glyconutrients (mannose) can be an energy source for diabetes (instead of the damaging glucose), providing energy without risk of eyesight damage. (Miracle Sugars, p.27).

Also, mannose can stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin “…thus lowering the amount of insulin needed to control this disease.” (Miracle Sugars, p. 27. I told you this was a good book! In case you’re wondering, I receive no remuneration from it whatsoever. Remember, I’m a physician. Doctors “make money the old fashioned way”…they charge you.)

Oh yes. Glyconutrients are NON-prescription. Anyone can get them and they are non-toxic (they’re food!) Safe, NON-prescription, effective…That’s the stuff real medical discoveries are made of. Diabetes may very well become a scourge of the past.

Think of it. No more friendly fire.

No more diabetes “status quo.”

…So far, so good…